For centuries archaeologists have been chopping their way, facing all sorts or trials and turbulent of dense forests to get one step closer and discover the hidden myths of the Mayan World.  Now, on Feb 2018, scientists found more than 60,000 Mayan ruins hidden beneath the Guatemalan jungle in Mexico. Archaeologists are calling this discovery a ‘game changer’.

“I think this is one of the greatest advances in over 150 years of Maya archaeology,” said Stephen Houston, Professor of Archaeology and Anthropology at Brown University to BBC News.

Scientists used high-tech airplane based lidar mapping tools to find this huge unimaginable Mayan network and they have found new pyramids, houses, palaces,  highways and defense structures along with discoveries they were previously never aware about the Mayan civilization.

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The results from the new laser technology suggests that the region supported an advanced society around 1,200 years ago. Archaeologists suggests that these ruins were probably once ruled by a mysterious Maya Dynasty called ‘Snake Kings’.

Earlier, archaeologists assumed that Mayans lived in isolated civilizations but this discovery proves that they have had brilliant interconnected cities with raised highways.

“We’ve had this western conceit that complex civilisations can’t flourish in the tropics, that the tropics are where civilisations go to die,” said Dr Marcello Canuto, an archaeologist at Tulane University to Independent “But with the new LiDAR-based evidence from Central America and [Cambodia’s] Angkor Wat, we now have to consider that complex societies may have formed in the tropics and made their way outward from there.”

The scans also depict irrigation and terracing systems that was used to make water available throughout the city.

What is even more mind baffling is that scientists believe this is just a fraction of the archaeological area and that there is more to be found.

Albert Yu-Min Lin, an engineer and National Geographic explorer told New York Times, “This world, which was lost to this jungle, is all of a sudden revealed in the data. And what you thought was this massively understood, studied civilization is all of a sudden brand new again”

 

 

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